About your Search

20090801
20090831
STATION
CSPAN 41
CNBC 27
CSPAN2 19
CNN 15
WHUT (Howard University Television) 14
FOXNEWS 10
WMPT (PBS) 9
MSNBC 6
HLN 4
WETA 4
WRC (NBC) 3
WJLA (ABC) 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
WBAL (NBC) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 161
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 161 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
. very happy to see all of you here. today's hearing will focus on insuring that america leads the clean energy transformation as we address the threat posed by climate change. i want to welcome our witnesses who will share their insights and expertise on this critical subject. we are facing two historic challenges in america today, a deep economic recession and the threat of unchecked global warming. during this hearing we'll examine the ways in which federal initiatives are already addressing both of these challenges. and about additional steps we can take to provide incentives for clean energy development to transform the american economy. this country can and should be a leader of the clean energy revolution. clean energy and climate legislation provides the certainty that companies need and the signal businesses are looking for to mobilize capital and harness the greatest source of power we have in this great country, american ingenuity. clean energy legislation is jobs legislation by creating powerful incentives for clean energy it will create millions of new jobs in america, it'll
, in solidarity with his hometown. >> i believe it would have an enormous impact upon america. in other words, you are telling the taxpayer that everybody is suffering and you're suffering. >> reporter: chicago's not the only american city that's forcing furlough days upon its workers. in fact, some local and state governments are incorporating them on a regular basis, desperate to cut budgets anywhere they can. michigan wants to save nearly $22 million through six unpaid days. in colorado, furlough days may be accompanied by pay cuts as well. but nothing compares to california, where more than 90% of state workers will be off on the first and third friday of each month until june of 2010. >> it's a much better alternative than people being laid off. >> reporter: despite the sacrifices by city workers, chicago will still be $300 million short of what it needs to fund next year's budget. diana alvear, abc news, chicago. >>> today, an american man who was in prison in one of the most reclusive and repressive countries on earth was set free after a visiting u.s. senator won his release. this man's fr
the campaign is there is no red america, no blue america, no republican, no democrat. there is one america. tonight if what we are hearing is correct, if he says we are going to cling to the public plan no matter what, he is saying blue america wins. i'm the president of that america. this government-run plan doesn't have the support in the middle. that's why he is losing democrat support in the senate and thinking of trying to jam this through quickly with 50 votes. >> roy, do you think this is something they would go ahead with or maybe trying to float this idea to put pressure on everyone to come to some sort of agreement? >> i think that has to be part of it. just today gibbs said they hadn't decided in they were going to stop negotiating with the republicans. kyl said he wasn't going to whip up votes and grassley saying he might not support the thing he was negotiating for. all the signals were there and they weren't sure. when would they be sure? when the support of the american people drop to 29%? this is something they are putting out there as a threat they could pull back. it is a
managed state in america? did you know that under democratic leadership, seven times, we have been named the best they to do business in america ended june known that we have even been named by education week as the state were a child is most likely to have a successful life? [applause] that is what democratic leadership means. we find solutions to everyday issues that everyday people care about. the want to keep that going? [applause] i want to keep it going because i may not be governor in january but i will still be a virginian. what i know now is that we are in some tough times. this has been the most challenging economy that virginia or the nation has faced since the 1930's. i have had to make some painful decisions as governor but i made the decisions i needed to make to keep virginia moving in the right direction. when you're a governor in tough times, you come to appreciate character of people who can make tough decisions and do the right things to put virginia first and i am here to tell you that i will not lose one second of sleep and in fact i will sleep with a big smile on my
for growth and prosperity in the long run. these are the jobs futuring of america, renovating schools and hospitals. the elkhart area has seen the benefits. dozens were employed to resurface the runway at elkhart airport. a four mile stretch of highway is being upgrade order u.s. 33. the health center has received recovery dollars to expand services and hire additional staff. and as part of the recovery plan, we're making an historic amendment to innovation. building a new smart grid that carries electricity from coast to coast, laying down broad band lines and high speed rail lines, and providing the largest boost in basic research in history to ensure that american leads in the break through discoveries of the new century. just as we led in the last. because that's what we do best in america. we turn ideas ainto inventions. history should be our guide. the united states led the world economies in the 20th century because we led the world in innovation. today the competition is keen, the challenge is tougher and that's why innovation is more important than ever. that's the key to goo
is an extraordinary icahn for latin america. he came to providence in 1960's which is when that america literature first came to international prominence and it became possibly the most popular and and most no literature in the world. it appeared in 1966 and not appear until the mid-1960s and not doing terribly well did not become later what it was to become an 1967 which was gabriel garcia marquez. his 100 years of solitude it was almost as if it was predestined it would finally cap latin-american and not all it was famous before he published it the most famous at this point* was ulysses his novel became famous oliver north america perhaps after he hadn't written the first that was it. it would be a best seller and a great latin-american novel. he just knew it. him and his friends started to write articles when even marquez was only halfway through it. it did not happen very often but it did then. most latin american novels published 500 or 1,000 would be a very good printer run in the 1960's but all of a sudden one-man publishes 8,000 was the first run and repeated a couple of weeks later and re
. i emphasize that they may not be representative of america. their views have to be taken into account. >> there is some disagreement. >> how are we supposed trust you? is there an option to say no to this bill? >> it is not about health care reform or insurance reform. it is about government control. >> i charge you with usurping authority not granted to you as a u.s. senator. >greta: houston, texas a councilwoman answers a cell phone while a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> if you're conscious allows you, what are you doing for america -- >> seriously, really. come on. [unintelligible] >> do you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy asked that question and joins us live. was there any explanation by the congresswoman by what happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about her using the phone. what appeared to be happening was her staff was telling her that there were local political leaders coming to the meeting that he -- that she should talk to. greta: did she pick up the phone in the middle of your question? do you know who she was
of which i think we must respect. >> beth mendelsohn with voice of america, the afghanistan service. if one of the candidates doesn't get 50% and this goes into a second round and things get complicated there, what are the constitutional laws that are in place? can karzai call the loya jirga? and also if it goes the way some of the things did in iran, what is the united states prepared to do in these circumstances? >> rinna? >> i'd like barney to comment on this as well. if there is a security situation then there are stipulations where a loya jirga can be called. but i'd like barney to speak in more detail about this as well. >> well, i'm not sure what your question is about. according to the constitution if no one gets more than 50% of the vote, then a second round has to be held within two weeks of the date of announce mentd of the result. perhaps your question is what is -- if there is civil conflict and it is not possible to do that. we of course do not want to address hypothetical questionsb3 like that. there is an international presence in afghan government that is our partner and if
wanted some legitimacy for their country. america has always said they would only talk to them in six- partyç talks, including our allies. kim jong-il got what he wanted, a former american president. as much as the white house and secretary of state say that there was no quid quo pro, and that president clinton was there on a private mission, -- it may have been a humanitarian issue, but even u.s. officials are telling us that he was given a briefing by cia and others before his visit. he was briefed on the latest with what they were doing, and there is no doubt duringç that three and a half hours with kim jong il, the issue must have come up. jon: is it possible that they held these meetings and did not discuss these issues? >> look at who met bill clinton. the deputy foreign minister who has been in charge of nuclear negotiations. he was very prominent. also, the north koreans, they broktwittered about this visit. they did not give much detail, just saying that president clinton came. the administration is trying their best to decoupled this visit from the nuclear issue. when yo
.p. morgan doing 20% of their mortgages. down towards the bottom, you have bank of america and wells fargo at 4% and 6%. host: let's put the basics backs on the table. it is called what? guest: under the umbrella of making home affordable, at the peace we are focusing on is the home affordable modification program. it is what buyers do if they are running into problems. they call their letter and say they want a hempo modifications . the servicer will figure out how much you can pay. the point is to get your monthly payments down to 31% of your income. host: how much money was set aside for this and how was it used? guest: they set aside a certain amount. there are several pieces to this. there is an incentive payment for each loan that gets modified that is successful. then there are annual payments of $1,000 as long as the lone state's current. the bar were actually gets money towards their payments going to pay down their principal. -- the bowerer actually gets money towards their payments. the servicer will reduce their payment to 38% and the government will split the difference with t
was going to help deliver a post racial america. so by having the knee jerk reaction against the white police officer, boy did he throw that in reverse. so he wastrying to correct both of those things with this beer summit. >> if henry gates were white and not black, do you think that any of this -- >> nobody would have paid any attention to it. smoz it was henry kissinger, everybody would have laughed and said they cuffed henry. it would have been a joke. >> if he were white, all of those talk show hosts who are screaming now about what obama did would be saying this is the sanctity of a man's home and it was invaded by the storm troopers. >> you are telling me if it was alan dershowitz we would have complained if they cuffed him? >> maybe not dershowitz. >> the fact that henry louis gates is a famous guy, a harvard professor is what brought it to the national station stage. this is a good opportunity -- >> do you think professor gates was outraged? they brought him to the police headquarters and photographed him. >> when i came to the states, the first thing i was told was don't argu
, and i hope you enjoy it. our members make up the most active and powerful union in america. today, we are in the battle of our lives as we push congress to enact real health care reform. we are using our union's power to counter some of the union lines that are spreading from coast-to-coast. we have spent roughly $1 million in the past month alone countering those lovely friends of america, the insurance companies. we are prepared to spend that much more in the months ahead. ouróy nurses are on tv with a powerful ad advocating for real health care reform. we have put organizers and staff into key congressional districts. we will not back down from this fight. america's working families are depending on us. this month, we are joining progressives in taking our message directly to members of congress with a nationwide highway to health care campaign, a rock-and-roll theme that is crisscrossing the country. nobody had better get in our way. stop by our booth and vigorous schedule. better yet, when the rv hitch your city, on board and blog about the energy you are seeing for healthcare r
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
.m. e to one of america's most besieged outposted. the pilots won't land in this valley except on the darkest of nights when they're escorted by gunships. the taliban often lie and wait in the darkness of this remote valley. the gunships fire a missile into the hillside, a warning shot. outpost is the further reach of america power surrounded by mountains here in the pakistani border. a landing so the pilots worried that their razor blades could clip the hillside. this is the only way in or out of a tiny piece of land. america feels it has to hold on to but isn't sure why. and while the world's only superpower has found itself trapped. the hills all around offer beauty and also constant deadly attacks. >> we're surrounded in a bowl. so we're constantly -- >> reporter: captain porter leads a few dozen men pinned down among the sandbags. they don't have much contact with the locals apart from when they shoot at their base. >> over 35 contacts with the enemy since we've been here just under three months. so keeping us on our toes. >> reporter: why? >> my boss told me to come here.
questions. they may not be representative of america, but they are significant, and their views have to be taken into account. >> how are we supposed to trust you? i know that is a tough question, but i will make it easy. is there an option to say no to this bill? because it does not seem like you have said anything today. >> it is really not about health-care reform or about insurance reform. it is about government control. >> senator cardin, authority not given to you as a senator. greta: houston, texas, the congresswoman holds a town hall and actually answers herself on as a cancer survivor asks her a question. -- answers to cell phone as a cancer survivor after a question. -- answers her cell phone as a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> seriously. really, i mean, come on. >> you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy miller asked that question, and she joins us. tracy, that video looks absolutely horrible. was there any explanation by the congressman about why that happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about using the phone. her staff or hey
of the dark rage and rhetoric in america. supporters of president obama -- supporters and critics of president obama's proposed health-care reform have been shouting at each other all across america. democrats have been arranging some of these meetings to sell president obama's healthcare plan, but opponents of that plan have been showing up in force. some driven by personal beliefs. others perhaps by politics and certainly encouraged by talk- show hosts. some of the most controversial moments we have seen came at a town hall meeting today in pennsylvania. the post -- republican turned democratic senator arlen specter. >> if you want to stay in the hall, we are not going to tolerate any demonstrations or going, so it is up to you. >> what it says is as a 74-year- old man, if you develop cancer, we are pretty much going to write you off. >> nobody 74 is going to be written off because they have cancer. that is a vicious, malicious, untrue rumors. you want to be let out of here, you are welcome to go. wait a minute, you want to leave, leave. >> i am going to speak my mind before i leave because
paper on the history of riots in america. my community had been torn up by riots in the aftermath of the killing of dr. martin luther king. she said fine, write about riots in america. for the first time in my life, i actually got turned on by english. i researched riots from the 1920's, overseas, and spent hours in the library. i came back and wrote a 140 page manuscript, as i recall. mrs. klinger took this manuscript home. she was a diminutive whiteshe took it home and came back after the weekend and calls me up and says ellis, i will tell you what. i will give you an "a" in this course. i am really not capable of judging this material. you need to send this to a professional. i paused and said, a professional what? i dunno and professionals. -- i do not know any professionals. >> she said, have you ever heard a woman called gwendolyn brooks? send it to her. see what she thinks. we got an address where she was teaching, and i sent gwendolyn brooks this manuscript on riots throughout history. i did not hear anything for weeks, and one saturday i got a call. it was gwendolyn brook
is being overshadowed about concern about the u.s.' america. tokyo's nikkei average tumbled 3% today. hong kong's hang seng is down sharply. in london the ftse opened lower. this comes after a down week on wall street last week. the dow fell 48 points and starts the week at 9,321. the nasdaq dropped 14 points to close at 1985. >>> general motors is looking to capitalize on the growing market for ultra low cost car in developing markets. "the wall street journal" is reporting that gm is planning to build a car that will sell for around $4,000. gm is looking to make up for declining sales in the u.s. the first car chrysler produces with new partner fiat may not be made in the usa. chrysler will build the fiat 500 in mexico. that could lead to a backlash among u.s. taxpayers who helped save the automaker but chrysler is said to be building the engines in michigan. >>> a new promotion to build up sales. ihop is offering free kids' meals seven nights a week for the next month with the purchase of an adult meal. according to "usa today" several smaller chains have been offering similar deals. >>
this company has seen. they're based in montreal, operations all over north america. it's a paper and wood company. highly cyclical. less worse than expect results, one of the top five performers in the russell 2,000 right now. the stock's up 23% today, up 60% since earnings season started a month ago and the company is saying they're having lower input costs and better cost controls. that is helping things out. dom tar, the former dominican tar and chemical with a big, big rally today. yeah, it's down but up from the bottom. back to you. >> thank you, matthew. franklin mutual advisors ringing the closing bell today in honor of the 60th anniversary of their mutual series groups, one of the oldest mutual funds out there. the group an's flagship here it, mutual funds outperform the s&p up nearly 26% over that period. joining me chairman and ceo of franklin mutual advisors peter langerman. more importantly, what was the last -- the first mutual funds came out in the 1930s. >> we were one of the first and i think the interesting thing for us, we are our 60th industry and basically doing the sa
africa and the operations of hezbollah. we had experts here in the audience dealing with latin america. the question is, what are the iranians doing? what is hezbollah doing in that area? and in connection with the iranian involvement, and we do have our record of almost 30 years, it seems to me that we have to ponder the future with great concern particularly when we see the continuity of the ahmadinejad regime in iran today. so again, the bottom line of the question of threats and response depends on the perception of the threat and the coming of around at that i think we have to develop in order to reduce the risk of terrorism. so unfortunately from the academic point of view and a practical point of view, we would have to deal with this issue in the coming months as well as the coming years. i like to thank this opportunity -- take this opportunity to thank our panelist for this discussion. at this point, i would also like to recognize the interns who have worked with us this summer, who are finishing the work tomorrow. would you all please rise? where are the interns? this is the
a redundancy. americans for prosperity is like saying swimmers for getting wet. america was built for prosperity. this is the thing people don't remember, a lot of people don't think about. some people just flat out deny. america was built for prosperity. people will tell you that american prosperity was an accident of history and geography. we just happened to land on a continent with a lot of natural resources. we just happened to know how to use them. we just happened to build a country, a mightity arsenal that defended democracy around the world almost a century and it was all an accident. that is absolutely not true. we people. and they talked about rights. and i want to get back to this. i will get back to this. one of the things that i find to be a hair-raising experience, fig ratively speaking, of course is the idea and you hear this from the left and hear it sometimes from people on our side of the aisle, will talk about health care as a right. people have a right to health care. it sounds good. people don't want to see people denied health care. but it is a fundamentally
with the great majority of that funding devoted to iraq and afghanistan. over that period, america's reliance on contractors has grown to unprecedented proportions, to support logistics, security and reconstruction efforts related to those operations. more than 240,000 contract employees, about 80% of them foreign nationals work in iraq and afghanistan at one time to support the department of defense. additional contractor employees support the department of state and the u.s. agency for international development. contractor employees outnumber u.s. military personnel in both theaters. they have a critical mission and according to reports from the military in theater, they are doing an exceptionally good job providing security, transportation, meals, laundry and other services. the questions raised today in no way detract from the overwhelming good opinions of contractors' support for u.s. missions or obscure the fact that nearly 1,400 contract contract employees have died on duty in. the government's concerns about the ability to evaluate the costs of contractor services and provide good ste
and happiness belongs to america. that if i am a woman from it all i do not like choice. i enjoy being a muslim woman does not pursue happiness and these were also issues that i responded to when i was writing. >> host: in one of the reviews of the book, they made the argument that perhaps your mother ayyad delusion about herself, about the life she created, the illusion that you got sucked into it in many different ways and became a part of it is a metaphor for the illusion of iran, a country that has an image of itself and what it wishes to be and thinks it is deserving to be bought is constantly underperforming. is that what you had in mind? >> guest: i knew that in writing this book i was also responding to different feelings and emotions about iran about the concept what home is or was. but people who read the book always had insight that you necessarily did not have. i do think that we have an illusion of the past and if like my mother we become frozen and do not have a critical and dynamic conversation with the past we will never leave that past. we can change regimes every ten years and
celebrate the impact justice sotomayor has already had on people across america who have been inspired by her exceptional life storymen story. we celebrate the greatness of a country in which such a story is possible. and we celebrate how with their overwhelming vote to confirm justice sotomayor, the united states senate, republicans and democrats, tore down yet one more barrier and affirmed our belief that in america, the doors of opportunity must be open to all. and with that vote, the senate looked beyond the old divisions and they embraced excellence. they recognized justice sotomayor's intellect, her integrity, and her independence of mind, her respect for the proper role of each branch of government, her fidelity to the law in each case that she hears, and her devotion to protecting our core constitutional rights and liberties. now, justice william brennan once said that in order for government to ensure those rights for all its citizens, government officials must be attentive to the concrete human realities at stake in the decisions they make. they must understand, as justice br
in -- accountable. we must and against a subtle but growing tierney of our time. we must take america back. thank you very much. and [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please give a hand to a leader in the conservative movement. the author of "leave us alone", groverno grover norquist. >> after the 2008 election, our friends on the left have some advice for a spread they suggested we move to the left and stop talking about taxes and spending. it was very similar to the advice they give us after goldwater lost in 1964, after watergate in 1974 and in 1992. the other team always cheerfully advises not to be us. they said please stop talking about taxes. this reminds me of the scene late in the movie where the bad guy says to the heroine, put down the gun and we will talk. and the movie goes on for another 25 minutes. they give us this advice because they understand that would strengthen as the center-right movement is our opposition to big government, our support for liberty and desire to have lower taxes and regulation and more freedom. but our coalition holds together because everybody here and e
is to provide world soft soft area, this is what america is good at and silicon valley is good at. >> that will continue, america's leadership in creating software. >> i think software is an area america will continue to lead and silicon will be at the tip of at that movement, it is a place we have excelled at, think of the products you like to use, they are mostly american, and they don't use it because it is built in america, they use it because it is the best. >> charlie: and why is that? you know, the thing is, we -- it is of course we have enormous talented people but what makes the software product work is an ability to build a business around a compelling idea. and that, while this seems obvious in america and especially silicon valley, in almost every other place if you want to build a business say how will you make money tomorrow? and silicon value think we build businesses around an idea, and then we figure out how we are going to make money and this is incribly important because if you want something to really work and something really complicated you cannot hire people
out of the limb, so we were playing a bank of america, which turned to be farther out of the limo owe. >> so john, paulson takes 2% of citi, but you think b of a is a better reward. >> well, paulson plays a little different game than we do. i believe he also owns bank of america. but at this point, where the survival is in much less doubt, you go farther out on the limb. and every investor, ourselves included, you get to choose how far on the limb you want to go, and we think citi is farther out on the limb and we're quite comfortable with b of a. >> what about peter's point that the search for yield is on, and perhaps risk has been repriced as a result of people will to go take the bet in the financials, ron? is that a bullish sign for you, longer-term or no? >> well, we think that's true. that's an entirely different point of view than mr. paulson would have. you know, so everybody gets to take their choice in here. and we do think that there's going to be a move. we think that since september, people are saving about 5% of their income, and so -- and much of it has been placed in t
more innocent lives in the future. >> america says that the insurgents trying to topple the somali government are linked to al qaeda. they want to impose strict islamic law across somalia, and they have the government pinned into a small corner of the capital, mogadishu. the war appears to be attracting support from extremists. several young men were arrested, accused of links to the terror group. under the clinton presidency, american troops tried to intervene in somalia. when helicopters were shot down and soldiers killed in the black hawk down incident, america pulled out. reluctant to send troops, the americans are backing somali forces loyal to the transition government, with the aim of preventing hard-line islamist forces from seeking power. in nairobi, hillary clinton met the president with a clear message. we are with you, and we will help you to stay in power. there were promises of training and weapons. >> if they want a haven in somalia, it would attract al qaeda and other terror groups and be a threat to the united states. >> this was a very public show of support for p
now to explain what that means is alan hartigan of america's town hall and cheryl galloway, the interim director for americans for prosperity. how do you feel about the town hall today? do you think it was successful? >> absolutely. it was a great event. we put this together in four weeks to have a crowd of 5,000 people in four weeks, is just phenomenal. over 20 organizes were represented. you helped out with that, i spoke to you earlier, you were part of organizing events as well as tea parties. how do you feel about what happened here today? >> i love to see the energy here. it's hot, august day, everybody was burning up. but there was a lot of enthusiasm and energy. people are glad to be able to tell their view, their side of the story. what they want to see washington do. i love seeing that people were ve responsive. i gave a speech to positive alternatives and people were enthusiastic about that as well. >> even on such a hot day, it was interesting to see how many people came out here. but from thevent these guys organizes here today, across the country, we've been he
attracted interest from america's beat necks in the 1950's. coincidentally with the interest of american diplomats and the central intelligence agency, people like jack karowac, who was an absolutely unknown writer, were developing an interest in buddhism, generally. first in zen buddhism and secondly through the work of robert campbell in buddhism. the mid 1950's were a period of cultural ferment in the united states with the beat neck movement that would eventually become the support basis for the tibetan resistance, but eventually took about 20 years, because something else was happening in 1955 when geshae sailed into new york harbor. here in washington, d.c., president eisenhower was trying to figure out how best to fight against international communism. in a series of national security council meetings throughout 955, he had been presented with options from open warfare to covert sub version of russian and chinese communist activity around the world. it was only recently learned that in the early 1950's, the u.s. intelligence services had picked up definitive information that russi
about america. where are the slogans that republicans used to use? these colors don't run. people have forgotten about that. host: here is a message from twitter. cspanwj is how you can reach us on twitter. this piece concerns the york politics. 19 months after ending his disastrous run for the presidency, rudy guiliani is clearing a path for a possible race for governor in 2010. arnold joins us from tennessee. we're asking about then bernanke is possible second term as the fed schair. caller: good morning, to be honest i guess we are doing the best we can with what we have to work with. have you ever read a book called "the creature from jekyll island." the author is g.edward griffin. there is another book by w albert called "the coming battle" which was released in 1899 and has just been read the released. the united states is under the control of the federal reserve. that is the main reason for all of the problems we're having. we need to realize that we need to love our neighbor as we love ourselves. all these people who were calling in here and calling obama a fraud, in the bible
for an entire year. if we had eliminated the income tax and told every business and every worker in america that you do not have to pay income tax anymore, it could you imagine what kind of rocket fuel that would be for our economy? instead, we're putting solar panels on libraries and things like that that are not want to work. it is amazing because i always say that this is a sad thing to say. one trillion is the new billion. when i first came to washington in the 1980's, we talked about a budget in the millions of dollars. the we have moved from the millions of dollars to the billions of dollars. i think that one of the problems we face is that the numbers are so big that people cannot relate to that. here is something you can do to relate this to your friends and kids. the other day, my friend was asking me how much one trillion dollars was. can anybody tell me about how many zeros there are in a trillion? 12. here's what i told my son. i asked who the best basketball player in the world was and he said bryan james -- hughes said lebron james. i told him that james made $40 million a yea
fundamentals. such as what is the nature of our economy? why do we consume so much? is america still a global leader? when you peruse the book shelves and read the op ed pages you see titles like a failure of capitalism. big government ahead. america the tarnished. now comes kurt andersen who examines how we got here and where we go in a new book, reset, how the cries kiss restore our values and renew america. it grew out of a essay he wrote in "time" magazine called the end of excess. i'm pleased to have our friend kurt andersen back at this table. >> you just saw me do a program on iraq an afghanistan. so what are your thoughts about america's efforts there and the risks that we have that afghanistan becomes a long slog as iraq became. >> it may welcome that. and that was a great show, to talk about. because i don't think as your guest said that people, americans generally understand what a -- what a large engagement afghanistan may become. i do think the fact that this obama administration, a guy who after all got elected as the anti-war candidate of the two leading democratic candidates h
invasion and conquest of america." good to see you both this morning. >> morning, carlos. >> bob, who did i elicit a laugh from? from pat or bob? >> you know, it's sort of a predictable title for one of pat's books, but it will probably sell a lot of books on the right and help the republican party to permanent minority status. >> i've written two books since then, bob, and that was about the immigration debate which as you recall we won pretty well. >> oh, yeah, you really won. you managed to drive that hispanic vote for the republican presidential candidate down from 44% to 35%. and republicans can't win without 40% of the hispanic vote. >> we're doing just fine right now. i notice obama's in strategic retreat, bob. >> actually, you know what? you guys have brought this to the perfect place. i didn't even need to set this up. hey, bob, i'm going to go to you first. is pat right, is the president in strategic retreat at this point midway through the august recess, and if not, what in your mind does he need to do in order to ultimately get meaningful health care reform done? >> i think he's
wife inside america's new rootless professional class i objected to that, to the publisher's decision to call this glass new. it goes back to the origins of world trade to the east india company and hudson bay company. there is nothing particularly new to be a fruitless soldier and diplomat or preacher or businessman or woman for decades ibm employees have said the initial stand for i have been moved. what is new, the relos themselves, the breadwinners -- i will start -- what is new is growth in numbers of corporate relos, a figure i estimate to be about 10 million people, that is the breadwinners themselves and their families and how that has grown with the growth of the american economy. american foreign trade to cite a statistical the goods and services we buy and sell abroad has leaped from about $400 million in 1970 to over 3 trillion now as companies american and foreign compete. they need people to carry their banner and build business far from home. you've not heard the word reloville because i made it up. it is about workers and families frequently relocating, they are see re
of the national security interests of america right now? >> i would feel more comfortable talking about this but i have more information on their contract. yes, sir. >> the president made a comment about that -- that the republican leadership made the decision -- [laughter] [inaudible] he didn't have a cross word either. i thought he -- >> that's what happens when he stuck with a cross word [laughter] >> it's an easy one to date. [laughter] >> it is thursday, a little tougher puzzle. >> it's august. >> the president said the republican leadership made the decision to oppose him. is this his political analysis or is this what he -- i mean is this like he knows this as a fact? >> i think it's -- i think it is a deducing from comments that he's read -- i think if you read comments in today's paper you might come to that conclusion. >> said he doesn't feel like the republican leadership is stealing from -- he doesn't fairly any more? >> i think there is a difference between some members of the republican party. i did you have seen members the president of dimensions that are -- >> he singled out repub
the very structure on which it rests. i call him jump skeet. being an american, working in america writing to convince americans of his pointed you must really be like having to tunnel through hardwood. chomsky is one of a small band of individuals fighting a coal industry and that makes them not only brilliant, but heroic. [applause] his work, so prolific, his personal support for so many so important. just this afternoon norm finkelstein was telling me how he had visited nome one summer at the beginning when he came back at the end and noam had already written two books, so he said to a friend, noam just finished two books and his friend said, so i read two books this summer to. he said no, but he wrote them. [laughter] and a think calling noam chomsky in turkey, it was february of 2002. he had not just gone there to speak, but to stand with the young publisher, who was facing years in prison for publishing noam chomsky's work. i called noam to interview him before he went to court, not knowing what would happen to him as well. when i rang him up, he answered the phone and he said amy, d
the power to communicate and hold our leaders accountable. we must educate america. we must take america back. thank you very much. . . >> after the 2008 election, our friends on the left had some helpful advice for us. move to the left. it was similar to the advice after goldwater lost, after clinton won in 1992. the other team cheerfully advises us to stop talking about taxes, nobody cares about taxes and more. that reminds me of the scene late in committee were the bad guys as to the heroine, put down a gun and we will talk. [laughter] and that the hair -- and if the hero is a foolish, the movie goes on for 45 more minutes. [unintelligible] our coalition holds together because everybody here and everybody in washington, who becomes a tea party activists, are there around the table, for different reasons but they are all there because on the issue that news there but and that brings them to politics, they want one thing from the federal government, they want to be left alone. [applause] taxpayers, don't raise my taxes. businessmen and women, don't regulate my job in business out of exi
important part. our part is to pvide world soft sofarea, this ishat america is good and silicon valley is good at. >> that will ntinue, america's leadershipn creating software >> i think software is a area amera will continue toead and silicowill be at the tip at tha movement, it is a place we have excelled , think of the products y like to use, th are mostly american, and they d't use it becausit is built in america, they use it because it is the best. >> charlie: and why tha you knowthe thing is, we -- it isf course we have enormous lented people but what makes the software product rks an ability to build business around a compelling idea. and th, while this seems obvious in ameri and especially silicon valley, in most every other place i you want to bud a business say how will you make money tomorrow? and silicon value thinke build busisses around an idea, and then we figu outow we are going to me money and this is incredibly important becausef you wantomething to really work and something really complicated you cannotire pele who are motivated b a paycck, they have to live and bre
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 161 (some duplicates have been removed)